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PS4 Razer Raiju Controller Unboxing And Impressions

The Razer Raiju PS4 Controller


The Razer Raiju PS4 Controller

The Razer Raiju is one of the few pro-grade controllers for the PlayStation 4, and it’s officially licensed by Sony. Two triggers are located on the back and two extra bumpers are on the top, for a total of four inputs that can be easily mapped to act as any other button. The analog sticks have removable rubber grips, the L2/R2 triggers have optional stops, and L1/R1 are physically larger than their DualShock 4 counterparts. Take note that the Raiju is not wireless and must be plugged into PS4 via USB. Many of the Raiju’s other features are covered in the following slides.

The catch is that the Raiju is currently only available in Sony EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa) markets, so anyone in the US will have to find a way to import it. It retails for £150 GBP, which converts to about $195 USD, so you’ll be paying a pretty penny either way.

What’s In The Box?


What’s In The Box?

The Raiju comes with a semi-hard canvas case, similar to the Xbox One Elite. There’s also has a pouch to store its USB cable and screwdriver for the extra triggers.

Razer Raiju’s Body


Razer Raiju’s Body

The controller’s body is noticeably bulky and much heftier than the DualShock 4, but this can be an upside. It’s suitable for users who have bigger hands or want more to hold on to. The Raiju itself weighs about 10 ounces or 12.3 ounces with the cable included. For reference, the DualShock 4 weighs 7.4 ounces.

USB Port


USB Port

One downside of the Raiju is the fact that its USB port has notches around it to fit the packaged USB cable. A USB cable with a low-profile housing could fit in here, but if you happen to misplace this particular cable, you’d be out of luck.

As we mentioned earlier, this controller is not wireless. It only works through a wired connection.

Face Buttons


Face Buttons

X, Square, Circle, and Triangle feel just like mouse clicks. These buttons have a much shorter throw than the DualShock 4, and there’s distinct tactile feedback with each press. While it takes time to adjust, the face buttons are more responsive on the Raiju.

D-Pad


D-Pad

The directional pad on the Raiju feels stiff and takes a considerable amount of force to press. Although it feels tactile, we wouldn’t recommend using it in games that heavily rely on the D-pad.

Analog Sticks


Analog Sticks

A definite highlight of the Raiju is the smoothness of the analog sticks. Going back to the DualShock 4, the stiffness of the sticks was more apparent and precise movements were a bit more difficult. Blue rubber grips come attached to the sticks, which we recommend keeping on since they prevented our thumbs from slipping off.

On The Fly Button Programming And Audio Control


On The Fly Button Programming And Audio Control

Below the analog sticks are four functional buttons for programming the controller’s extra buttons and adjusting audio. The left-most button initiates programming sequence and the left-middle button swaps between two profiles. A mic mute and volume control button are on the right.

Behind The Controller


Behind The Controller

Rubberized grips cover most of the surface on the controller’s handles and work well to prevent slipping. Here, we can see the two additional triggers behind the controller, labeled M3 and M4. The two sliders next to the L2/R2 are also visible. If you push them outward, the triggers will have a shorter throw.

Triggers


Triggers

L1/R1 bumpers have more surface area and a tactile feel, and are much easier to press as a result. L2/R2 triggers require a consistent amount of force to pull; the DualShock 4 triggers feel squishy by comparison. Here, we can also see the two extra programmable bumpers labeled M1 and M2.

Programmable Triggers


Programmable Triggers

A closer look at the extra triggers shows off their grooves. These felt similar to clicking a mouse button with its short throw and tactile feedback. The extra bumpers up top also have a mouse-like click when you press down on them.

Removing Triggers


Removing Triggers

If you don’t need the additional triggers or feel like they get in the way for certain games, you can remove them with the packaged star-patterned screwdriver.

How The Extra Buttons Feel


How The Extra Buttons Feel

Both the bumpers and triggers were very easy to program and use in games. They came in handy for jumping, reloading, and melee attacks in first-person shooters and dodging in third-person action games.

Overall Impressions


Overall Impressions

The Razer Raiju definitely has significant advantages over the standard DualShock 4. Triggers are easier to pull, analog sticks feel smoother, and the face buttons are satisfyingly tactile. Grips around the controller and on the sticks make the Raiju feel great and easier to handle. Its overall heft and weight may be a boon to some and burden to others. However, its limited availability and heavy price tag may prove to be cost prohibitive for most.

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